Courses

Passive Sampling Courses on Wednesday, May 31st

 

Plan to come to Toronto a day early and join us Wednesday, May 31st for a full day of short course modules on water passive sampling. The modules are 50 minutes each and taught by top passive sampling experts. There is something for everyone from the beginner the expert!  Select one or as many as you like, certificates provided on completion. Sign up by direct email to Heather Lord (HLord@maxxam.ca), specifying which modules you wish to attend.

 

 

AM Topics:

  1. Introduction to passive sampling for water analysis (Heather Lord, Maxxam)
  2. Practical considerations for designing a water passive sampling study (Heather Lord, Maxxam)
  3. Water sampling rates and what they tell us about passive samplers (Kees Booij, PaSOC)

 

PM Topics:

  1. Laboratory and data analysis for water concentration reporting (Heather Lord, Maxxam)
  2. Water passive sampling case studies (Heather Lord, Maxxam)
  3. Understanding the water boundary layer (Kees Booij, PaSOC)

 

Module Descriptions

 

  1. Introduction to passive sampling for water analysis (Heather Lord, Maxxam)

Passive sampling for surface water and groundwater is gaining in interest  and commercially available passive sampling devices are available for several classes of pollutants, including volatiles, semivolatiles and metals. This module provides an introduction to the available devices for each of these chemical classes, how their performance compares with the more traditional grab sampling, and the benefits passive samplers can potentially add to a project. You will also learn tips on how to use passive samplers in the field, recommended field and lab QA practices, what the laboratory processes are and how these differ from conventional sample submissions, and what to look for in a laboratory report.

  1. Practical considerations for designing a water passive sampling study (Heather Lord, Maxxam)

Once you’ve confirmed your site contaminants of concern and identified one or more possible passive sampling devices to use, the next step is to develop your deployment plan. In some cases deployment plans can be applied broadly and in others they need to be tailored for the device or site in question. In this module you will learn about the basics of deployment plan design as well as alternative applications and modifications of the standard devices to better tailor them to site conditions. We will also cover the details of storage, shelf life, handling, and quality assurance practices. How long to deploy is another critical question and in some cases advance site characterization will help determine the best answer. Finally we will cover issues around device retrieval and submission for analysis as well as how to specify the analytical processes needed to get optimal results.

  1. Water sampling rates and what they tell us about passive samplers (Kees Booij, PaSOC)

With increasing numbers of different passive sampler designs and models for estimating aqueous concentrations of chemicals it becomes more and more important to select the optimal sampler types and model for a particular monitoring application. The concepts of water sampling rate and sorption capacity are very useful to obtain a quick and easy understanding of passive sampler behavior. These concepts allow us to get an idea about detection limits, time-integrative capacity, rate of equilibrium attainment, and sensitivity to water flow velocities. A small piece of scratch paper is often sufficient to decide whether or not a particular sampler is suitable for the monitoring application, and to select the appropriate model for estimating aqueous concentrations. Rules of thumb will be provided.

  1. Laboratory and data analysis for water concentration reporting (Heather Lord, Maxxam)

The results of a laboratory analysis are typically in the form of mass of contaminant taken up by a sampler, or concentration of a contaminant in a sampler sorbent. In some cases this is sufficient but in many cases these data will need to be converted to estimated water concentrations to be able to properly assess risk or compare to required site standards. This module provides an introduction to the approaches used to estimate water concentrations from sampler mass or sorbent concentration data for some of the more commonly used devices and applications. Although a comprehensive treatment of the subject is beyond the scope of a single module, a basic understanding of the concepts will aid both in the selection of optimal study designs and informed interpretation of the final results.

  1. Water passive sampling case studies (Heather Lord, Maxxam)

This module consists of short overviews of several published reports on field deployments of water passive samplers. The focus for each is on study design and the main findings. At least one case study for each of the common devices in current use will be presented. Emphasis will be given to deployments in North America and.  projects that demonstrate the expected benefits of passive sampling.

  1. Understanding the water boundary layer (Kees Booij, PaSOC)

Knowledge of the water boundary layer (WBL) is important for understanding the effect of water flow velocity on the uptake rates of chemicals by passive samplers. Uptake rates of nonpolar chemicals are often completely controlled by transport through the WBL. For more polar chemicals, rate control by the WBL varies from moderate to insignificant. The structure of the WBL and the effect of compound properties and flow velocities on the WBL resistance will be discussed. Experimental methods to measure the WBL resistance will be presented. Strategies for incorporating knowledge of the WBL in models for sampler-water exchange will be outlined.